American Art Glass Showroom

Today I made my first really substantial sale of a nature/wildlife print.  It was a bald eagle photograph.  I’ve had nature/wildlife prints in a couple of retail locations for some time, and today, at the American Art Glass Showroom in Naperville, IL, I sold the image below for $200.  My largest single sale to date!  The print was a 20×30 print, double matted and nicely framed in a simple oak frame at 24×36.  Special thanks to the American Art Glass Showroom for their efforts in making this sale happen.  To see more of Night Owl Photography’s work, visit them at 605 E. Odgen Avenue #2, Naperville, IL  60563

  

 

www.nightowlphotography.com

 

 

Great Horned Owl Baby Age Progression

I visited the great horned owl nest again on Wednesday of this week, to discover the baby out of the nest, and up high in the tree.  It’s feathers had started to turn from the grey we’ve seen in the past, to the rich brown of a mature bird.  I’m not sure if the little guy flew up where he was perched, or if he walked up the branches.  My guess is that he flew the short distance to practice his flying for the first time.  The locals all said that it was the first time they had seen him leave the nest.  It was a beautiful day, with a blue sky, although it was quite windy.  It made for great pictures though.  The only drawback is that the sun was quite harsh for lighting.  I arrived late in the day around 4PM thinking it wouldn’t be so harsh, but I was wrong.  Oh well?!  🙂 

A security guard stopped to check out the owl when he noticed he wasn’t in the nest.  He told me a story about seeing one evening, a coyote scratching at the base of the tree with the nest, and the mother swooping in to attack the coyote.  The coyote ran off yelping as the owl made all kinds of “god awful” sounds in her attack.  Man, I wish I could have camped out there overnight just once to see the mother or father.  I never did get to see them. 

Today I received word that Bubo has left the nest and the nesting tree, and that no one could find him in nearby trees or perched anywhere else.  Could he have fledged the nest so early?  So early after branching for the first time?  The parent owls usually keep caring the the fledglings for up to 10 weeks.  I hope Bubo does well!  It’s likely that Bubo will not return next year, although his parents might.  So enjoy the video and the photographs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And now I’d like to take a moment to thank both Sue and Tsumi. Tsumi for being the liaison between his roommate Sue and I, and Sue for arranging security access to the nesting site for me so that I could photograph Bubo. Thanks to both of you!

 

 

 

http://www.nightowlphotography.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Great Horned Owl’s Nest

A few days ago, a friend called me to tell me he knew where there was a Great Horned Owl nest with babies. I was T-H-R-I-L-L-E-D! Like many people, the Great Horned Owl is my favorite raptor. (Yes, I know you all thought it was the American Bald Eagle, but it’s actually the Great Horned Owl. Eagles are just easier to find!) So much so, that my logo prominently displays one. Yet, I’ve never seen a Great Horned Owl in the wild, . . . until today!

Today the mother owl wasn’t in sight, but you could hear her hooting nearby. We watched and watched for her, but she never appeared in the nest. The baby was quite active though. It appears there’s only one fledgling in the clutch. So I got some cute photos of the baby for today.

Here’s something my rennie friends might find interesting. While researching the scientific name for the Great Horned Owl, which happpens to be Bubo Virginianus, I learned that the latter part of the name is named after the Virgin Queen, her majesty Queen Elizabeth I.

A special thanks goes out to that friend who called me to let me know about this photo opportunity. Thanks dude!